Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

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MorseMan
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by MorseMan »

Mikel wrote: 24 Oct 2020, 07:59 The 'new' 3 part licensing regime is much harder than the old C&G RAE. I have completed old RAE papers and they were a breeze in comparison.

Remember there were no practical elements to the old RAE for a start, unlike the first 2 parts of the latest regime (pre Covid obviously)

You only have to look at the content of both the syllabuses. If you divided the old RAE up into 3 parts how easy would the first part be?

Well I can tell you that most people would be able to pass it while still swimming around in their old man's ball bag, it's just that some (not all) of the old farts, who sat the old RAE, brag about it and think they are superior to the rest of humanity and make you literally want to spew.

The new foundation syllabus is the most difficult one so far (ask any trainer), but I do not think it is too difficult and anyone who thinks that perhaps is looking at the wrong hobby, but it is not beyond the capability of most people, just have faith in yourself and you WILL get through it.

Don't fall for the, 'Foundation licenses are given away free in a Cornflake box' routine that they roll out all the time, they remind me of the obnoxious old drunk in the pub. You know the sort, always bragging about what they did when they were your age and how young people today have got it too easy, just like a Harry Enfield character ie not to be taken seriously!

It is a technical hobby and once you have passed all three parts, you can rest in the satisfaction that you have achieved something to be proud of and you will have achieved a lot more than the old wrinklies who passed the toddler exam called the RAE (with a crayon probably).

Don't let the bigoted old farts who hold a full license and who sat the old RAE bully you. They are best just IGNORED, THEY ARE NOT SUPERIOR TO YOU, they just like too tell you they are, every chance they get.

Remember most of them are getting on a bit and soon they will die, just like the dinosaurs did because they could not handle change and I for one will not mourn their passing.
I beg to differ that the new system is harder, But it is a different way to enter the hobby in 3 bites.
Bite 1 the foundation is a very basic step into the hobby
That gives more band access than the RAE ever did.
You can take it pretty much as many times as you want in a year not twice like the RAE was.

Bite 2 intermediate should give a better understanding.

This is a message from a club intermediate to me.

As I say " You can explain things to people but you can't understand it for them !"

There may not have compulsory construction for the RAE but the kits required for the 3 bite system are toddler kits not challenging in any way & are virtually guaranteed to work if you can follow basic instructions.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by MorseMan »

:wtf:
Mikel wrote: 25 Oct 2020, 15:43 The Cult of RAE

All because they passed an exam (the Cult of RAE) that no longer exists and because of that, some of them claim it was special, and so gave them magical powers, that are now impossible to gain by mere mortals.

Like an ancient manuscript, handed down through the eons of time, with the knowledge only passed amongst the chosen ones.

Destined to save Humanity when the time comes, like a celestial angel levitating on a halo of blinding white light, who’s origin could only be in heaven.

Constantly talking in code so that everyone who listens, thinks they are discussing tomato plants and haemorrhoids on 80m every Sunday morning.

When in fact, they are discussing the mystic arts and the divinity of souls in the astral plane, that will determine the fate of the universe, and overwhelm the portents of doom, emerging from the bowels of hell.

Unfortunately for them, the internet was invented, so there are now copies of this mythical RAE manuscript doing the rounds and also unfortunately for them, the general consensus of opinion, is that it is about the same academic level as a 1980’s CSE in Metalwork.

Sadly for the rest of us, many of these followers of “the Cult of RAE”, think they are colonial missionaries, conveying the good word into even the deepest and darkest Council Estates.

Hell bent on educating the natives into the ways of “the Cult of RAE” and generally sticking their nose in where it’s not wanted.

With their delusions of grandeur they think they are the Band Police, Moral Police and the Magistrate all rolled into one.

At every opportunity, they will tell you, that what you are doing and thinking is wrong and illegal that you should be disgusted with yourselves, if you do not do, exactly what they say you should.

They constantly claim that a terrible fate awaits you if you don’t become like them:
“Don’t do that, it’s not legal, you will be arrested and sentenced to 5 years hard labour in a nudist colony, located in the north pole, with barbed wire wrapped around your genitals if you are not careful Sonny Jim”

Some of the “33 Degree RAE Brotherhood” claim that OFCOM stands for:

O – Other-world
F – Force
C – Coming
O – Old
M - Man

Go on, admit it, you have all come across these characters haven’t you?

Sometimes on the air and sometimes online and don’t they just want to make you scream?
Constantly pontificating, with their pretentious, self righteous and patronising, pompous diatribe?

Looking down their noses at anyone who is not a member of “the Cult of RAE”

Jesus, give it a rest you guys from “the Cult of RAE”, find a Thai Bride, slip some magic mushrooms in your partners paella or something, anything, but just get a life, please for all that is Holy, GET A LIFE and leave us all alone!
Have you been nibbling shrooms ? 🤔
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Mikel
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

MorseMan wrote: 27 Oct 2020, 11:24
Mikel wrote: 24 Oct 2020, 07:59 The 'new' 3 part licensing regime is much harder than the old C&G RAE. I have completed old RAE papers and they were a breeze in comparison.

Remember there were no practical elements to the old RAE for a start, unlike the first 2 parts of the latest regime (pre Covid obviously)

You only have to look at the content of both the syllabuses. If you divided the old RAE up into 3 parts how easy would the first part be?

Well I can tell you that most people would be able to pass it while still swimming around in their old man's ball bag, it's just that some (not all) of the old farts, who sat the old RAE, brag about it and think they are superior to the rest of humanity and make you literally want to spew.

The new foundation syllabus is the most difficult one so far (ask any trainer), but I do not think it is too difficult and anyone who thinks that perhaps is looking at the wrong hobby, but it is not beyond the capability of most people, just have faith in yourself and you WILL get through it.

Don't fall for the, 'Foundation licenses are given away free in a Cornflake box' routine that they roll out all the time, they remind me of the obnoxious old drunk in the pub. You know the sort, always bragging about what they did when they were your age and how young people today have got it too easy, just like a Harry Enfield character ie not to be taken seriously!

It is a technical hobby and once you have passed all three parts, you can rest in the satisfaction that you have achieved something to be proud of and you will have achieved a lot more than the old wrinklies who passed the toddler exam called the RAE (with a crayon probably).

Don't let the bigoted old farts who hold a full license and who sat the old RAE bully you. They are best just IGNORED, THEY ARE NOT SUPERIOR TO YOU, they just like too tell you they are, every chance they get.

Remember most of them are getting on a bit and soon they will die, just like the dinosaurs did because they could not handle change and I for one will not mourn their passing.
I beg to differ that the new system is harder, But it is a different way to enter the hobby in 3 bites.
Bite 1 the foundation is a very basic step into the hobby
That gives more band access than the RAE ever did.
You can take it pretty much as many times as you want in a year not twice like the RAE was.

Bite 2 intermediate should give a better understanding.

This is a message from a club intermediate to me.

As I say " You can explain things to people but you can't understand it for them !"

There may not have compulsory construction for the RAE but the kits required for the 3 bite system are toddler kits not challenging in any way & are virtually guaranteed to work if you can follow basic instructions.
I rest my case.
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Mikel
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

MorseMan wrote: 27 Oct 2020, 11:36 :wtf:
Mikel wrote: 25 Oct 2020, 15:43 The Cult of RAE

All because they passed an exam (the Cult of RAE) that no longer exists and because of that, some of them claim it was special, and so gave them magical powers, that are now impossible to gain by mere mortals.

Like an ancient manuscript, handed down through the eons of time, with the knowledge only passed amongst the chosen ones.

Destined to save Humanity when the time comes, like a celestial angel levitating on a halo of blinding white light, who’s origin could only be in heaven.

Constantly talking in code so that everyone who listens, thinks they are discussing tomato plants and haemorrhoids on 80m every Sunday morning.

When in fact, they are discussing the mystic arts and the divinity of souls in the astral plane, that will determine the fate of the universe, and overwhelm the portents of doom, emerging from the bowels of hell.

Unfortunately for them, the internet was invented, so there are now copies of this mythical RAE manuscript doing the rounds and also unfortunately for them, the general consensus of opinion, is that it is about the same academic level as a 1980’s CSE in Metalwork.

Sadly for the rest of us, many of these followers of “the Cult of RAE”, think they are colonial missionaries, conveying the good word into even the deepest and darkest Council Estates.

Hell bent on educating the natives into the ways of “the Cult of RAE” and generally sticking their nose in where it’s not wanted.

With their delusions of grandeur they think they are the Band Police, Moral Police and the Magistrate all rolled into one.

At every opportunity, they will tell you, that what you are doing and thinking is wrong and illegal that you should be disgusted with yourselves, if you do not do, exactly what they say you should.

They constantly claim that a terrible fate awaits you if you don’t become like them:
“Don’t do that, it’s not legal, you will be arrested and sentenced to 5 years hard labour in a nudist colony, located in the north pole, with barbed wire wrapped around your genitals if you are not careful Sonny Jim”

Some of the “33 Degree RAE Brotherhood” claim that OFCOM stands for:

O – Other-world
F – Force
C – Coming
O – Old
M - Man

Go on, admit it, you have all come across these characters haven’t you?

Sometimes on the air and sometimes online and don’t they just want to make you scream?
Constantly pontificating, with their pretentious, self righteous and patronising, pompous diatribe?

Looking down their noses at anyone who is not a member of “the Cult of RAE”

Jesus, give it a rest you guys from “the Cult of RAE”, find a Thai Bride, slip some magic mushrooms in your partners paella or something, anything, but just get a life, please for all that is Holy, GET A LIFE and leave us all alone!
Have you been nibbling shrooms ? 🤔
It's called humour, something I noticed some people do not have a sense of.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Ant »

Mikel wrote: 27 Oct 2020, 08:16
Ant wrote: 26 Oct 2020, 09:15
Tim Tom wrote: 25 Oct 2020, 19:14

Just had a look on that link, the bloke running that page is an actual weapon!

"The hobby is on its arse" he says as if trying to belittle new users and shaming them off the air waves will help.
The bloke who runs that page comes across as some bitter poisonous troubled soul, who probably has had his licence taken off him and lives in the back bedroom of his mums council flat.
Many of the fully licensed hams who give Foundation license holders a hard time are just old men, jealous of youth because they no longer have it and bitter, because for many reasons their 'qualification' no longer has the significance that it once had.

Foundation License holders should not take it personally though, as the stages of psychological and physiological development provide insights into why some people are content in old age and others are bitter and angry.

Some people struggle to face the realities that follow their transition into ‘elderhood’. We have all experienced 'The Guy Who is Irritated by Everything Syndrome' and for example shouts out of the window, 'you cant ride your skateboard there it's against the law', or 'Stop making so much noise in the street or i'll speak to your parents'.

There are too many reasons why this occurs to go into here, but one main factor is that as men age, they experience a slow and continuous decrease in testosterone production.

This is a completely normal phenomenon – yet for some men, the decrease is particularly steep and low testosterone can have “neural/psycho effects,” and one of those is “low mood and irritability.”

In other words, it is a contributing factor in something called 'Irritable Male Syndrome', a genuine medical condition, a good example in the real world is Donald Trump and in the fictional world Victor Meldrew!

Women suffer hormonal drops as they age as well, but this usually manifests itself in a different way to men, or to put it simply: Women fret, men yell.

As I stated, this is a completely normal phenomenon – yet for some men, the decrease is very steep and it can be like a bomb going off and everything and everybody annoys and irritates them including Foundation License holders!

According to Psychologists, between the ages of 50 and 65, (or even younger, sometimes!) every man needs to “let go of their their lost youth.” but some men are unable too, especially if they lose something they feel is even more vital – which is why Viagra is such a big seller!

This is a big topic and I have only revealed the tip of the iceberg, but the next time some older guy starts ranting at you 'Cornflake packet license' holders, ha, ha, try and show a bit of empathy as they are most likely going through a difficult time in their lives both physically and mentally.

I am 60 years old myself, but the difference is I understand what is happening to my psychological and physiological self and so I fight against 'Irritable Male Syndrome' and refuse to be a 'grumpy old man' (I don't always succeed) and I try my best to celebrate youth and assist and encourage them in as many ways as I can, rather than put them down at every opportunity.
You have a way with words :thumbup: :mrgreen:
Shack? Shack is a poorly built building in a third world country, which is on the brink of collapse. I'm not calling mine a shack...

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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by MorseMan »

Mikel wrote: 27 Oct 2020, 12:26
MorseMan wrote: 27 Oct 2020, 11:36 :wtf:
Mikel wrote: 25 Oct 2020, 15:43 The Cult of RAE

All because they passed an exam (the Cult of RAE) that no longer exists and because of that, some of them claim it was special, and so gave them magical powers, that are now impossible to gain by mere mortals.

Like an ancient manuscript, handed down through the eons of time, with the knowledge only passed amongst the chosen ones.

Destined to save Humanity when the time comes, like a celestial angel levitating on a halo of blinding white light, who’s origin could only be in heaven.

Constantly talking in code so that everyone who listens, thinks they are discussing tomato plants and haemorrhoids on 80m every Sunday morning.

When in fact, they are discussing the mystic arts and the divinity of souls in the astral plane, that will determine the fate of the universe, and overwhelm the portents of doom, emerging from the bowels of hell.

Unfortunately for them, the internet was invented, so there are now copies of this mythical RAE manuscript doing the rounds and also unfortunately for them, the general consensus of opinion, is that it is about the same academic level as a 1980’s CSE in Metalwork.

Sadly for the rest of us, many of these followers of “the Cult of RAE”, think they are colonial missionaries, conveying the good word into even the deepest and darkest Council Estates.

Hell bent on educating the natives into the ways of “the Cult of RAE” and generally sticking their nose in where it’s not wanted.

With their delusions of grandeur they think they are the Band Police, Moral Police and the Magistrate all rolled into one.

At every opportunity, they will tell you, that what you are doing and thinking is wrong and illegal that you should be disgusted with yourselves, if you do not do, exactly what they say you should.

They constantly claim that a terrible fate awaits you if you don’t become like them:
“Don’t do that, it’s not legal, you will be arrested and sentenced to 5 years hard labour in a nudist colony, located in the north pole, with barbed wire wrapped around your genitals if you are not careful Sonny Jim”

Some of the “33 Degree RAE Brotherhood” claim that OFCOM stands for:

O – Other-world
F – Force
C – Coming
O – Old
M - Man

Go on, admit it, you have all come across these characters haven’t you?

Sometimes on the air and sometimes online and don’t they just want to make you scream?
Constantly pontificating, with their pretentious, self righteous and patronising, pompous diatribe?

Looking down their noses at anyone who is not a member of “the Cult of RAE”

Jesus, give it a rest you guys from “the Cult of RAE”, find a Thai Bride, slip some magic mushrooms in your partners paella or something, anything, but just get a life, please for all that is Holy, GET A LIFE and leave us all alone!
Have you been nibbling shrooms ? 🤔
It's called humour, something I noticed some people do not have a sense of.
This is very true!
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by specializedrider »

I think the foundation licence is a great way to get into amateur radio. Not everyone is going to enjoy it so why spend all that time to study for a full licence. I passed my online foundation exam in September. I don’t think it was too hard, but I feel that there should be more training on how to operate your radio, especially if you self-studied like me and never attended a radio club course. As for me, I took the exam because I want to communicate over radio to other people with a similar interest. Over time I might find other aspects of the hobby I want to try.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

specializedrider wrote: 28 Oct 2020, 17:02 I think the foundation licence is a great way to get into amateur radio. Not everyone is going to enjoy it so why spend all that time to study for a full licence. I passed my online foundation exam in September. I don’t think it was too hard, but I feel that there should be more training on how to operate your radio, especially if you self-studied like me and never attended a radio club course. As for me, I took the exam because I want to communicate over radio to other people with a similar interest. Over time I might find other aspects of the hobby I want to try.
Well done and I hope you have a great time with your new callsign.

Above all, don't let the Barstewards get you down. :lol:

My experience working in a job that requires professional qualifications, is that however easy an exam paper is, some highly intelligent people still managed to fail it the first time around, mainly because they just naturally get stressed out over exams.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by MorseMan »

specializedrider wrote: 28 Oct 2020, 17:02 I think the foundation licence is a great way to get into amateur radio. Not everyone is going to enjoy it so why spend all that time to study for a full licence. I passed my online foundation exam in September. I don’t think it was too hard, but I feel that there should be more training on how to operate your radio, especially if you self-studied like me and never attended a radio club course. As for me, I took the exam because I want to communicate over radio to other people with a similar interest. Over time I might find other aspects of the hobby I want to try.
Congratulations on your pass & welcome to the hobby.
I'm sure you will enjoy the hobby & have great fun, especially when propagation picks up.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

MorseMan wrote: 28 Oct 2020, 22:21
specializedrider wrote: 28 Oct 2020, 17:02 I think the foundation licence is a great way to get into amateur radio. Not everyone is going to enjoy it so why spend all that time to study for a full licence. I passed my online foundation exam in September. I don’t think it was too hard, but I feel that there should be more training on how to operate your radio, especially if you self-studied like me and never attended a radio club course. As for me, I took the exam because I want to communicate over radio to other people with a similar interest. Over time I might find other aspects of the hobby I want to try.
Congratulations on your pass & welcome to the hobby.
I'm sure you will enjoy the hobby & have great fun, especially when propagation picks up.
Yes, Sunspot Cycle 25 is slowing winding up and propagation will pick up soon with a bit of luck.

Solar cycle 21 actually got me into the hobby in 1979, when in December of that year there there were almost 233 sunspots recorded! I bought an illegal CB radio (AM of course) from a guy in work for £80 (including a DV27 antenna).

The propagation was incredible during the peak of that cycle and you could hear truckers in the USA talking whilst travelling the highways day and night. The cacophony of noise on each channel ranging from heterodyne's and static crashes to stations from every part of the globe arriving at my receivers front end, all at once, was a noise I will remember to this day, it was incredible!

I threw a few sickies that year I can tell you, just to tune around and listen to that noise, it was mesmeric and almost transcendental in nature!

Lets hope Solar cycle 25 is as impressive, we are due a good one :D
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by MorseMan »

I came into CB radio in 1978, went legal in 1981 & gave up about 1983.
Found out about CB when a neighbour came over my stereo.
My early days in CB saw me as one of a small group of 49mhz radio modifiers working DX with a couple of watts to a 6 ele homebrew beam.

I passed the RAE in May 1992 & compulsory morse test in April 1993

I too found some of the old school look down the nose at CB operation but they are a minority.

In 2002 I had a major operation & because of a 9 week sick leave I unplugged the microphone & went CW only.

Nowadays I'm fairly inactive in radio & recently surrendered my license so I can have my original call back in 2022.

Since 1992 I have taught both full RAE & Novice course
& assisted in teaching the new 3 tier system prior to covid19.
My main interests are electronics construction & short wave listening

Call me a weathers sucking dinosaur with a chip on my shoulder for starting this thread if you like.

I welcome anybody to the hobby by whichever route they came because they took the required qualification to gain access.

There is no excuse for some amateurs attitude towards different license classes, Nor is there any excuse for poor operating by any license class.

All I'll say is stick to the license conditions of the class you hold & treat everyone as you expect to be treated yourself, But most of all enjoy your hobby.

On occasion I use a microphone but operation of QRP CW is what I prefer.
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

MorseMan wrote: 29 Oct 2020, 11:36 I came into CB radio in 1978, went legal in 1981 & gave up about 1983.
Found out about CB when a neighbour came over my stereo.
My early days in CB saw me as one of a small group of 49mhz radio modifiers working DX with a couple of watts to a 6 ele homebrew beam.

I passed the RAE in May 1992 & compulsory morse test in April 1993

I too found some of the old school look down the nose at CB operation but they are a minority.

In 2002 I had a major operation & because of a 9 week sick leave I unplugged the microphone & went CW only.

Nowadays I'm fairly inactive in radio & recently surrendered my license so I can have my original call back in 2022.

Since 1992 I have taught both full RAE & Novice course
& assisted in teaching the new 3 tier system prior to covid19.
My main interests are electronics construction & short wave listening

Call me a weathers sucking dinosaur with a chip on my shoulder for starting this thread if you like.

I welcome anybody to the hobby by whichever route they came because they took the required qualification to gain access.

There is no excuse for some amateurs attitude towards different license classes, Nor is there any excuse for poor operating by any license class.

All I'll say is stick to the license conditions of the class you hold & treat everyone as you expect to be treated yourself, But most of all enjoy your hobby.

On occasion I use a microphone but operation of QRP CW is what I prefer.
Yes, I agree with your comments. Good points well made. :thumbup:
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by Mikel »

There is an interesting article on 'Essex Ham' at the moment and it is worth reading the whole page, but the salient points are:

Was the RAE Exam Easier than Today’s Exams?

What was covered at RAE?

We looked at the last RAE Exam, the December 2003 RAE. and compared it to today’s syllabus:

52% of the RAE exam would be covered off in today’s Foundation
34% would today be classed as Intermediate
14%, mostly electronics theory, would fall under “Full”


Based on our review of the December 2003 RAE, only 11 of the 80 questions were equivalent to today’s Full. Over half of the RAE questions were equivalent to today’s Foundation.

Only 14% of questions fell into the “Full” category, meaning that under RAE, 11 Full questions were asked, compared to 60 today.

https://www.essexham.co.uk/rae-exam-reviewed.html
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by LeakyFeeder »

Ant wrote: 14 Oct 2020, 14:33 Whilst looking through groups, I found this.....

https://www.facebook.com/droptheFL
Anyone know.who runs that page?
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Re: Is the foundation amateur radio license too hard ?

Post by paulears »

Most really skilled hams in any time period had skills we don’t have generally nowadays. Simple stuff like electronics theory and soldering, the exam of the day kept the hobby functioning and able to grow. Some of those people would be unable to function given a dmr radio and the programming software. Each decade needs a different test, always has. The hobby continually evolves. The nuisance and even damage modern kit can cause needs constant adjustment to make the hobby relevant. We all believe OUR exam was harder, for us, it was, but the next one tested different things for a purpose. It’s also of course a gatekeeper. To keep fly b6 nights out of the hobby. This too has always been the case. Exam passes who are still active in five years time show a large majority just did the exam and passed with no real permanent interest. I read that only 5 percent of people who buy a Hornby model railway are still buying Hornby kit in five years time. Easy in, based on cash in your pocket does not generate a proper hobby. We are the same. Buy a baofeng for fifty quid and it can go in the loft when you get bored, or you give it to the grandchildren to play with as a toy. most people might be very different spending 800!
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